Nepal: Pangbuk Ri (6,716m, Schneider map; 6,625m, HMG-Finn), southeast face, Ghost Ride the Whip. By David Gottlieb

Southeast face of Pangbuk Ri, showing Ghost Ride the Whip. David Gottlieb

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By David Gottlieb, AAC

Pangbuk Ri (6,716m, Schneider map; 6,625m, HMG-Finn), southeast face, Ghost Ride the Whip.

In spring 2009, while climbing Jobo Rinjang with Joe Puryear, I saw for the first time Pangbuk Ri. With a massive dual summit and steep flanks on the Nepalese side, it presented an alluring objective. Two years later I had the privilege of returning to the area with Chad Kellogg. After a pleasant week acclimatizing in Rolwaling, we trekked over the Tashi Lapcha to meet Da Temba Sherpa, who had flown to Lukla with our expedition equipment. We established base camp at the toe of the Pangbuk Glacier, next to the last easily accessible water…(read more)

 

Nepal: Cho Polu (6,700m), west face and southwest ridge. By Jordi Corominas

Spanish route on west face and southwest ridge of Cho Polu. Bivouac sites marked. Jordi Corominas

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By Jordi Corominas, Spain, translated by Alex Horner

Cho Polu (6,700m), west face and southwest ridge.

Elena Parga and I spent a week in Kathmandu, waiting for the plane to Lukla. As far as Island Peak base camp the trail was full of tents and people, but then it was another world—nobody, only mountains. Beyond Lhotse Shar base camp we were forced by loose blocks on the lateral moraine to make a roped descent to the glacier. We then crossed the entire rubble-covered glacier and pitched our tent below the west face of Cho Polu, at 5,300m. The previous year we’d attempted this face, but exhaustion proved stronger than our willpower. We thought we’d find some of our gear but only came across two rappel anchors…(read more)

 

Nepal: Thulagi (7,059m), attempt from the south and tragedy. By Lindsay Griffin, Mountain INFO

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By Lindsay Griffin, Mountain INFO

Thulagi (7,059m), attempt from the south and tragedy.

In November 2010 Belarusian Nikolay Bandalet attempted unclimbed Thulagi alpine style with two Russians, climbing the far right side of the west face of Manaslu to a ridge at 6,400m, then descending the opposite flank to the upper Thulagi Glacier (AAJ 2011). Ahead, the northeast ridge of Thulagi looked complex, and given the committing nature of the situation, the climbers descended.

Bandalet returned in the spring with a four-man Belarusian team…(read more)

 

Nepal: Athahra Saya Khola Himal (6,767m), southeast ridge over Hindu Himal (6,306m) and Lilia Peak (6,425m). By Paulo Grobel

Looking east up Athahra Saya Khola Valley. (A) Pt. 6,621m. (B) Fukan Glacier. (C) Hindu Himal. (D) Panbari. (E) Lilia Peak. (F) Athahra Saya Khola Himal. (G) Athahra Saya Glacier. Paulo Grobel

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By Paulo Grobel, France, translated by Todd Miller

Athahra Saya Khola Himal (6,767m), southeast ridge over Hindu Himal (6,306m) and Lilia Peak (6,425m).

Athahra Saya Khola Himal (Mountain of 1,800 Rivers) is a bizarre name, one that evokes the feeling of a faraway place, a mythical wonderland of Buddhist culture, exotic. This is the name we gave to a previously unclimbed 6,767m summit on the Tibetan border, just north of Panbari (6,905m), in the region between Samdo and Phu, north of the Manaslu massif. Athahra Saya Khola is the Nepali name for the river that flows from the foot of the mountain and is the ancient name of the region now known as Nubri…(read more)

 

Nepal: Kyajo Ri (6,186m), northeast face, attempt; Kusum Kanguru (6,370m), southwest rib and northwest ridge, attempt. By Ben Dare

Kyajo Ri seen from high on ridge above Machermo to northeast. (1) Southeast ridge (Americans, 2005). (2) 2011 New Zealand attempt. (3) 2009 Italian attempt. Ben Dare

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By Ben Dare, New Zealand

Kyajo Ri (6,186m), northeast face, attempt; Kusum Kanguru (6,370m), southwest rib and northwest ridge, attempt.

In March Steven Fortune, Mike Rowe, and I arrived in the Solu Khumbu and established base camp at 5,050m, below our first objective, the northeast face of Kyajo Ri. Initially we attempted the standard route up the southwest ridge, starting from a high camp at 5,500m below the unclimbed south face. We retreated at just over 6,000m in deteriorating weather, when I was struck on the hand by falling ice and unable to continue climbing.

There followed a rest period at base camp, where we waited in vain for the weather and my injured hand to improve, ultimately leaving Steven and Mike to attempt our proposed new direct line up the northeast face…(read more)

 

Nepal: Jannu (7,711m), east face attempt. By Elizabeth Hawley and Richard Salisbury

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By Elizabeth Hawley, AAC Honorary Member, Nepal, and Richard Salisbury, The Himalayan Database

Jannu (7,711m), east face attempt.

Five Koreans led by Kim Hyung-il attempted the east face of Jannu (presumably Jannu East, though the exact line is unknown)…(read more)

 

Nepal: Gaurishankar (7,135m), southwest face attempt. By Elizabeth Hawley and Richard Salisbury

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By Elizabeth Hawley, AAC Honorary Member, Nepal, and Richard Salisbury, The Himalayan Database.

Gaurishankar (7,135m), southwest face attempt.

Germans David Goettler, Stefan Glowacz, and Klaus Fengler hoped to climb a new line on the southwest face. Approaching via the Tengmarnag Gorge, they established Camp 2, in early May, at 5,050m at the foot of the face…(read more)

 

Nepal: Dingjung Ri/Rima Mancho (6,263m), first winter ascent, north face. By Lindsay Griffin, Mountain INFO

North face of Dingjung Ri/Rima Mancho. Andy Parkin

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

By Lindsay Griffin, Mountain INFO, from information provided by Andy Parkin, Richard Salisbury/Himalayan Database, and the Alpine Club Himalayan Index

Dingjung Ri/Rima Mancho (6,263m), first winter ascent, north face.

After time spent acclimatizing, Parkin returned to his tent one afternoon to find clothing had been stolen. That night he was attacked: rocks, some as large as half a kilogram, were thrown through his tent. He scared off the assailant and moved down to a yak herder’s house closer to Chhule, where he had no further problems…(read more)

 

Nepal, Mukut Himal: Tsartse (6,343m) reconnaissance, by Jim Frush

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal, Mukut Himal, Sandachhe Group)

Tsartse (Tasartse, 6,343m), reconnaissance.

By Jim Frush, AAC

Dhaulagiri and Sandachhe Group of Mukat Himal from Muktinath. Peter Ackroyd

In autumn, Peter Ackroyd, Sam McClary, and I hoped to make the first ascent of Tsartse on the east side of Hidden Valley, ca 10km northeast of Dhaulagiri. This peak is clearly visible from the Muktinath-Jomsom trail. Despite close proximity to the relatively major center of Jomsom, until recently there has been little climbing activity in the Hidden Valley. The highest peak of the Sandachhe Himal is Pk. 6,403m, followed by Tashi Kang (6,386m) and then Tsartse. Tashi Kang was first climbed in 2002 by Yasue Mogi (Japan) with Gyalzen Sherpa (other members stopped 15m below). It was climbed again in 2006 by Romanian Constantin Lacatusu and two Germans, Frank Muetzner and Goetz Wiegand. They continued over the summit to make the first ascent of Pk. 6,403m (naming it Pk. Europa), and also attempted Tsartse but were foiled by poor conditions.
We decided to tie our climbing into a circumnavigation of the Dhaulagari Group, eventually crossing the French Pass (5,360m) on October 25 and descending into the Hidden Valley, where the weather remained cold and windy. We established base camp at 4,860m on the eastern edge of the valley, not far from the river. Several hundred meters north (down valley) from our camp, a drainage ran west. Climbing up it, on the 27th, we reached the site of our high camp at the edge of a glacial lake (5,540m). From this point it looks straightforward to circumnavigate the lake, climb the glacier into the high basin out of which the four major summits rise, and pick a target. While we hoped to find a more direct route to the top of Tsartse, we understood that previous attempts had focused on reaching it via a traverse of Tashi Kang…. (read more)

 

 

Nepal: Cholatse north face, winter, Russian Route, by A. Piunova

(Back to: Asia, Nepal, Central Nepal)

Cholatse (6,440m) north face, calendar winter ascent, Russian Route.

From material provided by Anna Piunova, mountain.ru

North face of Cholatse seen from Lobuche East. (1) French Route (Badaroux-Batoux-Challamel-Mora-Robach, 1995). The dotted line shows the Korean variations during the first winter ascent (Park Jung-hun-Chai Kang-sik, 2005). (2) 2010 Russian Route. To the left is Pk. 6,367m on the ridge northwest of Tawoche. Joel Kauffman

Galya Cibitoke, Alexander Gukov, Sergei Kondrashkin, Viktor Koval, and Valery Shamalo from St. Petersburg arrived in Kathmandu at the end of February and from there reached the north side of Cholatse via a trek over the Chola Pass. Their goal was the large rock buttress right of the 1995 French Route. During the second week of March, five days into the first attempt, the very strong female alpinist, Cibitoke, lost consciousness. She had to be brought round by artificial respiration and an injection of dexamethasone. The team retreated to base camp.

Despite Cibitoke recovering quickly, and eager for another attempt, her teammates felt it best for her to descend to lower altitudes, and Kondrashkin accompanied her. Later, they realized the probable cause of her sickness was carbon monoxide poisoning from a faulty Jet-Boil stove.

On March 14, after only one day’s rest at base camp, Gukov, Koval, and Shamalo started back up the route but with a change of plan. The first foray had showed that the upper, partially overhanging pillar would need much aid, a portaledge, and capsule style. The team had not brought a ledge and wanted to climb in alpine style, so they followed a slanting line up left, bypassing the overhanging pillar to reach the upper section of the French Route. The initial pitches followed snow and ice runnels to a complex rock section, which the three crossed on aid. Above, the climbing was a mixture of free (with ice tools) and aid…. (read more)

 
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